546

dynamicafrica:

#EarthDay: Located in the Horn of Africa and expanding over the area known as the Afar Triangle - spanning across Ethiopia, Eritrea and Djibouti, lies a salty terrain known as the Danakil Desert.

Despite extremely high temperatures - the highest recorded temperature being 64.4°C/148°F - the region is home to the Afar People who have lived in the area for centuries. Afar People are highly skilled at mining the salt in the area by hand, aided with the use of specially crafted tools.

The Danakil Depression, which forms part of the Afar Triangle, hosts the lowest point in Africa - Lake Asal which lies at 155 metres or 509 feet below sea level.

Many volcanoes also exist in the region, including Erta Ale and the Dabbahu Volcano. In recent years, the Erta Ale volcano has erupted three times - in 2005, 2007 and 2008. The most recently recorded eruption of the Dabbahu volcano was on September 26, 2005.

Within the Erta Ale range lies the Dallol volcanic crater which was formed by a combination of the intrusion of basaltic magma in Miocene salt deposits and subsequent hydrothermal activity. The green liquid, which can be seen above, that surrounds the crater are discharged from hot springs in the area that release brine and acidic liquid. The term Dallol was coined by the Afar people and means dissolution or disintegration describing a landscape made up of green acid ponds (pH-values less than 1) iron oxide, sulfur and salt desert plains.

Happy Earth Day!!

2915

artblackafrica:

Nigerian artist Joseph Eze’s (b.1979) portrait series deals with the intersection between Nigeria’s politics and the female body. Click the images for the title and date

757

thechanelmuse:

Divided Family: Through Music, Cubans Trace Their Roots To Sierra Leone

It is often said that music has the power to bring people together. That sentiment is definitely an understatement when it comes to the Afro-Cubans community Ganga-Longoba of Perico. 

Cuba’s Ganga people have been singing the same African chants for generations, but it wasn’t until an Australian researcher took interest in the songs, that they were able to trace their chants to a remote village in Sierra Leone, 170 years after the slave trade.

“When I first filmed the Ganga-Longoba, I believed their ceremonies were a mixture of many different ethnic groups,” says historian Emma Christopher, of Sydney University. “I had no idea that a large number of Ganga songs would come from just one village. I think that’s extremely unusual,” she says.

After tracing their roots back to Sierra Leone, four Cubans made the trip to the African country to delve more into their history. Christopher captured the moment for the documentary They Are We.

"Cuba was cut off at a time when other nations in the Americas were going through black pride and fighting for some justice for what happened to their ancestors," says Dr. Christopher, who points out that the island’s 1959 revolution declared racism ‘solved’. That left a lot of Afro-Cubans adrift, not knowing how to celebrate where they came from and be proud of it," she says.

Whilst many Cubans of Spanish descent have rushed to seek out their ancestry—and passports—Afro-Cubans have been far less anxious to do the same. Organizing a reunion for the divided “family” wasn’t easy given restrictions on traveling from Cuba at the time, and limited resources. But eventually, four Cubans did make their ancestors’ voyage in reverse - to Sierra Leone.

“When I opened my mouth to sing, they just stood there staring,” Elvira Fumero recalls of her arrival in Mokpangumba. “Then it was like an explosion. They started to sing the responses, and dance with me. And I knew then that this was where the Ganga came from,” she says, smiling.

For Alfredo Duquesne, visiting Sierra Leone changed everything.

"It was as if I’d just left the previous weekend. I touched the soil and thought: ‘This is it. I’ve come back,’" he says, describing himself now as ‘at peace’. "At last I know where I come from," Alfredo says. "I’m not a stranger anymore."

Source

8568

dynamicafrica:

In Photos: Portraits by photographer Jalani Morgan.

It’s always strange and a bit surreal to me when I look at a photograph of strangers and somehow manage to feel as though the person behind the lens has so aptly managed to capture the essence of those pictured. Perhaps it’s a bit of romanticism on my part, but I can’t help but feel that way when looking at the work of photographer Jalani Morgan. What may on the surface seem to be a simple portrait becomes an intensifying three-way relationship between the subject, the photographer and viewer.  A two-dimensional image is brought to life and in a matter of seconds, upon gazing at Morgan’s portraits, I have no option but to feel a close connection to the unknown faces captured by his lens.

Jalani Morgan is a portrait, fine art and documentary photographer. 

Born in Toronto, Ontario, and raised in Scarborough. He was influenced by his parents’ teachings of the African Diasporas and politics and through that is interjected into his art. 

He produces work that investigates the representation from the African diaspora.

Currently he is studying at York University in Toronto obtaining his degree in Anthropology and African Studies.

29850

rufftoon:

sircuddlebuns:

Skip the Use - Nameless World

I AM SO IN LOVE WITH THIS! THE SONG AND THE ANIMATION ARE SO GOOD I AM HAVING AN OUT OF BODY EXPERIENCE PLEASE WATCH THIS YOU WILL NOT BE SORRY

Reblogging, because this is a better quality version than the last link I had.

Once again, music video set into the world of Zombillenium, by Arthur De Pins. The book should be turned into an animated feature film.

424
Reblogged from Polaroid SF
polaroidsf:

4/20 & Easter on the same day?!? San Francisco, it’s about to get crazy UP IN HERE.

Today is the Hunky Jesus Contest !!

polaroidsf:

4/20 & Easter on the same day?!? San Francisco, it’s about to get crazy UP IN HERE.

Today is the Hunky Jesus Contest !!

1152

bluedogeyes:

Am I a prophet? A time-traveling cartoonist? (via Pocho)

This weekend POCHO Florida Burro Jefe Santino J. Rivera sent me a heads up about a Tweet featuring one of my editorial cartoons. I clicked the link and just about fell out of my chair.

The graphic in the Tweet was a side-by-side presentation of my cartoon showing a Native American confronting an Indian-mascot-garbed sports fan next to a photograph of a Native American confronting an Indian-mascot-garbed sports fan (image, above.)

They are eerily similar. The strange part was that I drew my cartoon in 2002, and the photo was taken last week in Cleveland, home of the Cleveland “Indians”:

Artist website / twitter / facebook

39

gayeroticartarchive:

art by Harry Bush

"…just little fun doodles"

Harry Bush was an accomplished graphic artist who secretly drew thousands of gay pieces that even his family had no idea of. His decades of experience working in design for women’s magazines had polished his talent to unbelievable heights. Truly one of the greats…it’s a shame that he never lived to see how influential he became, but he would never have ‘come out’ while alive.

5586

brianmichaelbendis:

Blow Up - Shintaro Kago

(Source: valqiria8)

118