642

elwueonquedibuja:

Entropia I, II y III

Nunca es malo rebloguear mis propios dibujos que suben otras personas XD

(Source: hughesoff)

228
Reblogged from National Novel Writing Month

Battling Clichés & Tired, Old Tropes: Foreigners as Food

lettersandlight:

image

It’s an age-old writers’ question: What do I do about clichés and well-worn tropes? This month, we’ve asked authors about the clichés and tropes they find themselves falling back on, and how they fix, invert, or embrace them. Today, Mitali Perkins, author and editor of , discusses the problem of using food as a descriptor:

CLICHÉ: Using food to describe a character’s skin color or race

Have you noticed how writers sometimes describe the physical appearances of non-white characters? A default strategy is to use food-related metaphors and similes. Does your Chinese character have almond-shaped eyes? Does your Nigerian love interest have skin like dark chocolate or espresso? If so, you may have fallen into the dreaded “Foreigner as Food” trope. (If all your characters are white, you’ve probably managed to avoid this particular trap, but consider asking if your setting and plot truly demands that sort of cast—but wait, that’s not my beef here. Even though my skin is the color of a well-done burger.) 

I have no idea why we default to food when we describe the skin, eyes, and hair of people who aren’t white. And believe me, white writers are not the only ones who do this without thinking. It affects all of us who grew up reading fiction mostly featuring white characters. Maybe we have good subconscious intentions. The edible stuff we use to describe nonwhite appearances typically is familiar and tasty—maybe we’re trying to help our readers feel closer to marginalized characters. Now they are neither strange nor foreign! They are yummy!

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4079

wetheurban:

SPOTLIGHT: Mind-Bending Photo Manipulations by Martin De Pasquale

Tons of photographers use Photoshop to insert new elements into their photographs, but not all of them can create the crazy and mind-bending images that Buenos Aires-based art director and digital artist Martin De Pasquale does.

Read More

448

scienceisbeauty:

This artist (Marcello Barenghi) is absolutely awesome.

215

thebristolboard:

Forgotten masterpieceComplete original art for “Shadow of the Axe” by Russ Heath (art) and Dave Sim (story) from Creepy #79, published by Warren, May 1976.

Not my kinda subject matter, but impressive old-school intricate panel/image design like you don’t see anymore. 

The evocative panel compositions work both independently and combined into a page

Beautiful inking.

66
Reblogged from HOMO ILLUSTRATED
artslant:

There’s a new male on Finland’s post… Finland honors Tom of Finland with a postage stamp: http://bit.ly/1hMCilM

artslant:

There’s a new male on Finland’s post… Finland honors Tom of Finland with a postage stamp: http://bit.ly/1hMCilM

1
241
Reblogged from Maps on the Web
newsillustrator:

A brilliant piece of teamwork drawing on all skills, or a bunch of different individual’s creations tacked together on deadline? You decide. At least three of those hours used up standing around hoping for truth to become apparent.
Seven hours worth of work for four or five of us. A cartographer, a writer, and a couple or three of graphics folks, and someone to tell us what we are doing wrong.

newsillustrator:

A brilliant piece of teamwork drawing on all skills, or a bunch of different individual’s creations tacked together on deadline? You decide. At least three of those hours used up standing around hoping for truth to become apparent.

Seven hours worth of work for four or five of us. A cartographer, a writer, and a couple or three of graphics folks, and someone to tell us what we are doing wrong.

140
Reblogged from Neuroscience
neurosciencestuff:

The Mediterranean Diet Has Varied Effects on Cognitive Decline Among Different Race-Specific Populations
While the Mediterranean diet may have broad health benefits, its impact on cognitive decline differs among race-specific populations, according to a new study published in the Journal of Gerontology.
The team of researchers, including Ben-Gurion University of the Negev (BGU Prof. Danit R. Shahar RD, Ph.D, analyzed an NIH/NIA prospective cohort study [Health ABC] conducted over eight years in the U.S. to measure the effects of adherence to a Mediterranean diet. Prof. Shahar is affiliated with the BGU S. Daniel Abraham International Center for Health and Nutrition, Department of Public Health, Faculty of Health Sciences.
The Mediterranean-style diet (MedDiet) has fewer meat products and more plant-based foods and monounsaturated fatty acids from olive and canola oil (good) than a typical American diet.
To assess the association between MedDiet score and brain function, the researchers used data of several Modified Mini-Mental State Examinations (3MS) on 2,326 participating older adults (70-79). The 3MS is an extensively used and validated instrument designed to measure several cognitive domains to screen for cognitive impairment and commonly used to screen for dementia.
"In a population of initially well-functioning older adults, we found a significant correlation between strong adherence to the Mediterranean diet and a slower rate of cognitive decline among African American, but not white, older adults. Our study is the first to show a possible race-specific association between the Mediterranean diet and cognitive decline.”
The researchers note that further studies in diverse populations are necessary to confirm association between the MedDiet and cognitive decline, and to pinpoint factors that may explain these results.
(Image: Getty Images)

Some good news for black folks: the Mediterranean diet seems to slow down mental decline, associated with aging, more for us.

neurosciencestuff:

The Mediterranean Diet Has Varied Effects on Cognitive Decline Among Different Race-Specific Populations

While the Mediterranean diet may have broad health benefits, its impact on cognitive decline differs among race-specific populations, according to a new study published in the Journal of Gerontology.

The team of researchers, including Ben-Gurion University of the Negev (BGU Prof. Danit R. Shahar RD, Ph.D, analyzed an NIH/NIA prospective cohort study [Health ABC] conducted over eight years in the U.S. to measure the effects of adherence to a Mediterranean diet. Prof. Shahar is affiliated with the BGU S. Daniel Abraham International Center for Health and Nutrition, Department of Public Health, Faculty of Health Sciences.

The Mediterranean-style diet (MedDiet) has fewer meat products and more plant-based foods and monounsaturated fatty acids from olive and canola oil (good) than a typical American diet.

To assess the association between MedDiet score and brain function, the researchers used data of several Modified Mini-Mental State Examinations (3MS) on 2,326 participating older adults (70-79). The 3MS is an extensively used and validated instrument designed to measure several cognitive domains to screen for cognitive impairment and commonly used to screen for dementia.

"In a population of initially well-functioning older adults, we found a significant correlation between strong adherence to the Mediterranean diet and a slower rate of cognitive decline among African American, but not white, older adults. Our study is the first to show a possible race-specific association between the Mediterranean diet and cognitive decline.”

The researchers note that further studies in diverse populations are necessary to confirm association between the MedDiet and cognitive decline, and to pinpoint factors that may explain these results.

(Image: Getty Images)

Some good news for black folks: the Mediterranean diet seems to slow down mental decline, associated with aging, more for us.